Newsroom

CROW Case of the Week: Nine-banded Armadillos (#18-2048, #18-2049 and #18-2050)


Nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the most widespread of the armadillo family, expanding through North, Central and South America. While only 20 species of the armadillo exist, the nine-banded species is said to be the only one found in the United States. more...

The Lowly Opossum; More Miraculous Than Imagined


Our natural environment here in Southwest Florida is perfect in its design, with each plant and animal playing their part in the delicate balance of life. One important player that is often misunderstood is the Virginia Opossum. This oft-maligned marsupial definitely suffers from an image problem — it is frequently perceived more as a giant, dirty, scavenging rat rather than a beast of beauty. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Animal Ambassadors


At CROW, countless animals have come to the medical hospital from around Southwest Florida with various injuries. Unfortunately, even while CROW medical staff provides outstanding treatment to all patients, some are just beyond repair. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Barred Owl (#18-1811)


The barred owl (Strix varia) is the prototypical owl that gets its name from the coloring of its wings and tail, a barred brown and white shade. These large, stocky owls have round heads, no ear tufts, brown eyes and rounded tails. Also referred to as a hoot owl, the barred owl has been compared to the spotted owl in appearance, though the spotted owl is smaller in size and has spots rather than streaks. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Roseate Spoonbill (#18-1768)


The roseate spoonbill (Platalea ajaja) is a long-legged, medium-sized wading bird that has been called majestic and flamboyant – not necessarily in the same sentence. The plumage of an immature spoonbill is a pale pink and becomes a brighter and more impressive pink color as it grows into an adult. more...